Last edited by Kazranos
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Dynamic economic modeling of soil carbon found in the catalog.

Dynamic economic modeling of soil carbon

by James Vercammen

  • 54 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in [Ottawa] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soils,
  • Carbon sequestration,
  • Teneur en carbone,
  • Sols,
  • Carbon content,
  • Piégeage du carbone

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by James Vercammen
    SeriesTechnical report -- 1-02., Publication -- 2112/E
    ContributionsCanada. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 33, 6 p. :
    Number of Pages33
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25217711M
    ISBN 10066231770X

    sequester carbon. Better understanding of the role of soil—particularly the soil microbiome—and how agricultural practices affect the carbon cycle may help formulate strategies to reduce the impact of agriculture on climate. Scope of the workshop The workshop addressed a defined and focused set of topics that relate to the. Table Soil Carbon Pool up to 1-Meter Deep for Soil Orders of the World’s Ice-Free Land Surface Table Estimate of Erosion-Induced Carbon Emission.

    The Kyoto Protocol, which came into force in February , allows countries to resort to ‘supplementary activities', consisting particularly in carbon sequestration in agricultural soils. Existing papers studying the optimal carbon sequestration recognize the importance of the temporality of sequestration, but overlook the fact that it is an asymmetric dynamic process. It aims to determine the trajectory of soil C dynamics, describe some of the rate-determining mechanisms, and estimate the potential of various agroecosystems for removing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2). The emission of CO 2 from external energy expenditure also merits inclusion in the overall C cycle of a given agroecosystem.

    A Review of Soil Carbon Dynamics, An Integrated Methodology edited by W.L. Kutsch, M. Bahn and A. Heinemeyer (Cambridge University Press ). Reviewed by Rattan Lal. This book describes methods to assess a vital natural resource: soil organic carbon (SOC) in natural and managed ecosystems. the use of models to help analysts and decision makers understand likely future outcomes as well as the implications of alternative policies. This book presents in detail a pair of models of the economics of climate change. The models, called RICE (for the Regional Dynamic Integrated model of Climate and the Economy) and DICE (for the Dynamic.


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Dynamic economic modeling of soil carbon by James Vercammen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest sink of terrestrial carbon and also is the most important properties for soil quality and health. Soil carbon dynamics is a complex process. DYNAMIC ECONOMIC MODELING OF SOIL CARBON Technical Report # Prepared by James Vercammen University of British Columbia Contract #01BC March For Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Strategic Policy Branch.

DYNAMIC ECONOMIC MODELING OF SOIL CARBON Author: James Vercammen. This book provides an integrated view on measuring and modeling soil carbon dynamics. Based on a broad range of in-depth contributions by leading scientists it. Our modeling framework extends economic farm household models to incorporate the dynamic nature of natural resource management and its implications for household welfare, and to permit a meaningful interface with biophysical processes through soil carbon by: 3.

The initial development of soil organic C models, such as the RothC and CENTURY models [Jenkinson et al., ; Parton et al., ], began in the s to simulate the effects of different agricultural practices on crop yields, soil C and N dynamics, and nutrient cycling for long‐term agricultural experimental by:   Modeling soil organic carbon dynamics under shifting cultivation and forests using Rothc model using different models and land uses, to understand the soil carbon dynamics at different temporal scales.

and Manipur to the south. Agriculture is the most important economic activity and other significant economic activity includes forestry. We examine the dynamic management of a soil resource—the issue at the core of both environmental and development challenges in developing countries.

Our theoretical framework extends the traditional bioeconomic model of renewable resources to soil carbon management and investigates the effects of changes in agricultural practices on farmers. Modeling Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics for Soil Management clarifies the confusion by presenting a systematic summary of the various models available.

It provides information about strengths and weaknesses, level of complexity, easiness of use, and application range of each model. With development of mathematical models that simulate changes in soil organic carbon, there have been considerable advances in understanding soil organic carbon dynamics.

This paper mainly reviewed the composition of soil organic matter and its influenced factors, and recommended some soil organic matter models worldwide. While SOM models have been widely used to predict long-term trends in soil carbon dynamics (Grace et al.,Smith et al.,Luo et al., ), the potential effect of pool structure change on simulated long-term carbon and nitrogen dynamics has not been explicitly analyzed.

About this book. Carbon stored in soils represents the largest terrestrial carbon pool and factors affecting this will be vital in the understanding of future atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. Soil Carbon Dynamics provides an integrated view on measuring and modeling soil carbon dynamics. Based on a broad range of in-depth contributions by leading scientists it gives an.

SOIL ORGANIC CARBON DYNAMICS IN AGRICULTURE: MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION FROM DAILY TO DECADAL TIMESCALES Matthew Phillip Pelton M.S. University of Nebraska, Advisor: Adam J. Liska Soil carbon (C) is the largest terrestrial C pool globally, containing more C than. Description This book contains 31 chapters, grouped into 7 parts, which provides a link between the complexity of the scientific knowledge on soil carbon, and how this knowledge can be applied for multiple benefits, and the complexity of the policy and practice arenas where soil and land management impact many sectors: environment, farming, energy, water, economic.

The importance of building/maintaining soil carbon, for soil health and CO 2 mitigation, is of increasing interest to a wide audience, including policymakers, NGOs and land managers. Integral to any approaches to promote carbon sequestering practices in managed soils are reliable, accurate and cost-effective means to quantify soil C stock changes and forecast soil C.

Simple dynamic model of soil carbon content, with a time step of one year. The equations that describe the dynamics of this system are adapted from the Henin-Dupuis model described in Jones et al.

The soil carbon content is represented by a single state variable: the mass of carbon per unit land area in the top 20 cm of soil in a given year (Z, -1). Carbon stored in soils represents the largest terrestrial carbon pool and factors affecting this will be vital in the understanding of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

This book provides an integrated view on measuring and modeling soil carbon s: 1. Soil erosion and deposition may play important roles in balancing the global atmospheric carbon budget through their impacts on the net exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystem and the atmosphere.

Few models and studies have been designed to assess these impacts. In this study, we developed a general ecosystem model, Erosion-Deposition-Carbon-Model. Soils contain the largest dynamic reservoir of carbon on Earth - larger than that stored in the atmosphere and vegetation combined.

This makes soils a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Soil carbon (C) is mostly bound in what we call “soil organic matter”, or SOM—although carbonate (CO3) minerals also contribute to soil C storage. From the reviews: "Nieder and Benbi are just in time with their recent book on carbon and nitrogen in the terrestrial environment.

The book is a comprehensive compilation of information highly useful not only for soil scientists who are searching for reference values, models, and concepts, and hundreds of useful references in the respective field, but also for scientists and.

v model with soil and climate data; model simulations were conducted at a grid-cell level of × km (1 mi2). With this approach, we assessed the long-term impacts of tillage practices on SOC to a depth of 20 cm and to the soil profi le in Iowa.

Our objectives were (i) to assess current SOC stocks in corn–soybean. Soil carbon refers to the solid terrestrial matter stored in global soils. This includes both soil organic matter and inorganic carbon as carbonate minerals.

Soil carbon is a carbon sink in regard to the global carbon cycle, playing a role in biogeochemistry, climate change mitigation, and constructing global climate models.

A dynamic bio-economic model has been used at watershed level in Nepal to analyze the land-use changes, forest and soil conditions and their resultant impacts on carbon (C) sequestration.

Planning horizon of the model extends over a period of 25 years. The objective function is maximization of the sum of discounted net income flows from agriculture, livestock .The new model was validated against field results for short‐term (1–9 years) decomposition experiments, the seasonal pattern of soil CO 2 respiration, and long‐term ( years) soil carbon storage dynamics.

A series of sensitivity runs investigated the impact of varying agricultural practices on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration.